Skip to main content

The Scariest Thing to Happen at a Party--And some Advice on Drinking While Streaming Video Games

streaming video games


I was probably about 23 at another house party many years ago. I forget exactly how I ended up there, some friend of a friend of a friend kind of thing. The night was a very big blur, and I remember having far too many drinks that night. To my unfortunate expense.

Drinking while streaming video games is a fun time, especially if you can't speak correctly. I typically like to drink a moderate amount of whiskey, then I'll talk shit to everyone (without meaning it). But there's something important that you need to know about drinking while playing video games, and it's this:

Twitch, at some point, can consider it "self-harm" under the Terms of Service. Obviously, there are grey areas where if a Twitch mod is watching your stream and decides you've gone too far, it's their discretion to suspend your account for such actions. I would caution against going to far...keep in mind you are in the eye of the public, and what you say and do can be held against you. I mentioned this one time in my Extensive Guide to Streaming Video Games for Beginners. Regardless, the best idea if you're going to drink on stream is to do it in some kind of moderation. I can get strong tendencies to yell at people in the name of hilarious moments because an inner troll resides deep within me.

Passing out on stream...no. Do not do this. You will receive a ban.

At this particular party I went to, I remember there was a "bad" toilet and I forgot about my instruction to not use it. Someone left a few large dookies in the shitter, and in my state of drunkenness I flushed the toilet.

The water started rising up in the toilet and I ran out of the bathroom, then booked it home never to return back to that apartment again. Thank Jesus. That's a true story.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Project Tempo: Amazon's Answer to a Cloud Gaming Service

Amazon's Answer to Stadia: Project Tempo, Their Cloud Gaming Service It wasn't even a week ago that I thought about how Amazon might respond to Google's foray into gaming. The videogame livestreaming giant doesn't really hold a candle to the likes of Microsoft, Sony, Nintendo, or (now) Google when it comes to video games. There was Breakaway, a project that was abandoned , and on the horizon, there's New World and Crucible. If that's the launch lineup for Amazon in the coming years, it pales in comparison to Google's cloud gaming service and the current library it has to offer. But recently, Amazon announced its Project Tempo , a gaming service that seeks to rival against Google Stadia. In the age where dopamine and serotonin are linked to instant gratification, this is a welcome announcement from Amazon, a company that has dominated livestreaming since its acquisition of Twitch TV in August of 2014. And it's pretty obvious why Amazon could easi

Alien Isolation: Jumpscares and I Don't Mix

Alien Isolation Jumpscares Yep, that's the alien. If you know me well, you know that I am an incredibly jumpy person. Even a host on my Twitch channel often makes me jump and rear my arm back in defense against...a sound. But that unfortunate disposition hasn't been abundantly public until I played Alien Isolation. JFC, I nearly punched my equipment several times avoiding the alien in that game. As much as the game makes me jump like a 5-year old, I enjoy every minute of it and regret that I hadn't purchased it sooner. I actually downloaded it from the Xbox Game Pass. I think it's a fantastic deal for 15 dollars a month since a lot of titles are swapped in and out. Regardless, my absolute horrid sensitivity to in-game sounds (even non-jumpscare moments make me jump) often serves as a point of entertainment for people on the Twitch channel. In the very beginning moments of AI, I rarely could relax. Puckered butthole? Indeed. Streaming Alien Isolation has been a

Mutazione: An Interesting Adventure Game Published by Akupara Games

Mutazione by Akupara Games I'm vaguely reminded of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and his wacky tales with  Mutazione , an interesting adventure game from Akupara Games and developer Die Gute Fabrik. I recently  livestreamed it on twitch  for a few nights and had some remarks about it.    Marquez's largest narrative device was magical realism, and that's what you'll see in a lot of  Mutazione.  Magical realism is a concept where supernatural events happen in the natural world. A lot of that happens in this game, which tells the story of a girl (Kai) that visits a strange island in response to a sick relative's request. That's about as realistic as the game is because once Kai arrives on the island, she's greeted by friendly mutants, humanoid beings, and plants that do a lot more than just decorate the island. The backstory is that a giant meteor hit the island and affected the lives of everyone, changing humans into mutants over the course of many years. Most of the