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The Scariest Thing to Happen at a Party--And some Advice on Drinking While Streaming Video Games

streaming video games


I was probably about 23 at another house party many years ago. I forget exactly how I ended up there, some friend of a friend of a friend kind of thing. The night was a very big blur, and I remember having far too many drinks that night. To my unfortunate expense.

Drinking while streaming video games is a fun time, especially if you can't speak correctly. I typically like to drink a moderate amount of whiskey, then I'll talk shit to everyone (without meaning it). But there's something important that you need to know about drinking while playing video games, and it's this:

Twitch, at some point, can consider it "self-harm" under the Terms of Service. Obviously, there are grey areas where if a Twitch mod is watching your stream and decides you've gone too far, it's their discretion to suspend your account for such actions. I would caution against going to far...keep in mind you are in the eye of the public, and what you say and do can be held against you. I mentioned this one time in my Extensive Guide to Streaming Video Games for Beginners. Regardless, the best idea if you're going to drink on stream is to do it in some kind of moderation. I can get strong tendencies to yell at people in the name of hilarious moments because an inner troll resides deep within me.

Passing out on stream...no. Do not do this. You will receive a ban.

At this particular party I went to, I remember there was a "bad" toilet and I forgot about my instruction to not use it. Someone left a few large dookies in the shitter, and in my state of drunkenness I flushed the toilet.

The water started rising up in the toilet and I ran out of the bathroom, then booked it home never to return back to that apartment again. Thank Jesus. That's a true story.

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